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May 06, 2009

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ceemac

I would think that his ideas on the discontinuity between the OT Kingdom and the NT will be a challenge to those of us in the Reformed family. We have always looked to the OT for instruction on how to order society.

The whole city on a hill thing.

Obviously you have the Theonomists on the right. And the Jubilee folks on the left or the earlier Progressive dream of building the kingdom of god in a "Christian Century".

But on a more pratical level it's my understanding that if you look at the layout of the original Puritan villages in New England you can see that those plans were guided by the instructions to the Israelites on how to set up camp in the wilderness.

And that's the sort of stuff the drives Lutheran "2 kingdoms" christ/culture/paradox folks crazy.

Michael W. Kruse

"I would think that his ideas on the discontinuity between the OT Kingdom and the NT will be a challenge to those of us in the Reformed family."

"And that's the sort of stuff the drives Lutheran "2 kingdoms" christ/culture/paradox folks crazy."

Amen!

I think Stackhouse takes a position between some Anabaptist's embrace of disengagement and the "ushering in the Kingdom" via political action take of some reformed folks. That is certainly my perspective as well.

I also think it is appropriate to look to the OT for ethical instruction but the nature of the covenant morphs a bit with the resurrection of Christ and the creation of the church.

Bill Crawford

Seems like Kingdom of God is a political/ethical category, not a cultural one.

Does Stackhouse state the relation between Kingdom and culture?

Michael W. Kruse

"Seems like Kingdom of God is a political/ethical category, not a cultural one."

I think Stackhouse would say that the political/ethical is a subset of the cutlural (At least I would.)

With "Kingdom" there is a "King," and there is a "dom," or domain. The domain is the land, the people, and the political/ethical fabric that holds it all together.

"Does Stackhouse state the relation between Kingdom and culture?"

I'd say that is the core subject matter of the book. He will begin by revisiting Niebuhr's typology and three 20th Century realists but the back half is going to be his reflection and analysis on how the two relate.

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